A lunar eclipse occurs when the earth gets between the moon and the sun. Normally the reason we see the moon "lit up" is that the sun is shining on it. When the earth blocks that light from reaching the moon, the earth's shadow causes a lunar eclipse.

In comparison, a solar eclipse is when the moon gets between the earth and the sun, and the physical moon is blocking our view of the sun.

Here are some photos of the March 15, 2003 lunar eclipse, taken with a F707 digital camera. Note that it IS safe to look at a lunar eclipse, since all you're seeing is the moon with a big shadow on it.

The photos are fully zoomed in with the optical but NOT with the digital zoom. In the first photo you can see the clouds around the edges. I reduced the size of the first one slightly so the image wouldn't be huge. The other 3 are all at 100% size.

Note: I was trying all 3 settings of the "dot in center" spot meter button while taking numerous pictures. Two of the 3 came out "glowy" like in that cloud picture. The third setting came out perfectly crisp as you see below. Apparently it's the plus-in-the-center exact spot meter that works for lunar photography with this camera.

Lunar Eclipse

Lunar Eclipse

Lunar Eclipse

Lunar Eclipse

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