Oxendine Outlaws of Robeson County
Lumbee American Indians


In the 1860s to 1880s, a band of Lumbee Indians got sick of being mistreated by the white people in the South Carolina area. They became "Robin Hoods", running around and wreaking havoc. The leader of this band was Henry Berry Lowery. The Oxendines were very involved in these situations. There were many news reports of them. In fact, the last report I find of the outlaws (in 1873) is that Stephen Lowery is thought to have shot poor Floyd Oxendine. Floyd was about to marry Rhody Lowery, Henry Berry Lowery's widow. :)



Calvin Oxendine was part of Henry Berry Lowery's band of outlaw/hero Lumbee Indians. The gang had a long-running feud with the Confederate Home Guard in Robeson County, North Carolina.

Date: 1865
Original Format: Carte de Visite Photograph
Photographer: C. W. Yates

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Henderson Oxendine was part of Henry Berry Lowery's band of outlaw/hero Lumbee Indians. The gang had a long-running feud with the Confederate Home Guard in Robeson County, North Carolina. He was tried for murder and publicly executed by hanging on March 17, 1871.

Date: 1865
Original Format: Carte de Visite Photograph
Photographer: C. W. Yates

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New York Times October 8, 1870, page 1.

"The . . . band of negro outlaws and murderers . . . have committed the most flagrant outrages during the past twelve months . . . ." Robberies were committed at the homes of Augustus Leach and Mrs. McKay; two people were wounded and one killed. The article notes, "The gang is said to number about fifteen, under the leadership of a notorious ruffian named Henry Berry, of Lowry."




July 15, 1871
The Baltimore Weekly Sun
Baltimore, Maryland

"Wilmington, NC July 12 - Pap Oxendine, one of the negro outlaws of Robeson county, was captured in Richmond county, brough to this city, and lodged in jail to day. Notwithstanding the terrible murders and crimes to which he has been a party, no attempt has been made by the people of Robeson county or this city to do him violence."






July 18, 1871
New York Times Front Page






January 6, 1873
New York Times






August 14, 1873
New York Times



Floyd Oxendine is said to be 24, so born around 1849. He is the son of James Oxendine, who was probably born before 1830.




To Die Game - a book about the Lowery Band
The Robeson, SC Oxendines

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